R.I.P T MODEL FORD

Taledragger
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Taledragger
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180 gram Vinyl
Yellow Vinyl Ltd. Ed.
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The Ladies Man CD
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On superb retellings of blues staples, the fuzzy, thick-as-molasses reverb-fueled blues-rock-chug of the trio menacingly oozes behind the Ford’s blacker-than-blue cracked growl (…) With a little help from his friends, T-Model Ford has once again walked into the studio and bettered himself. – Alan Brown / PopMatters
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A spectacular blues record. While the boys in Gravelroad complement T-model’s personality and style, they never get in his way; instead, they combine for some dark and dirty blues tunes. – James Orme / Slug Mag
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On these eight tracks — a mix of originals, classics like “Little Red Rooster, and classic inspired riffs like the “Mystery Train” rewrite “Same Old Train” – the touches of saxophone, keyboards and guest guitars elevate Ford’s guttural growl to something on a par with Howlin’ Wolf himself. – Mark Jordan / GoMemphis
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Production is huge on this release. Something that was hinted at on last years The Ladies Man but it’s fully realized this time around, as if they just decided "Fuck it. Let’s blow this thing up and wreck some speakers and take out some minds, too!" It’s thoroughly post-modern primitive and pure beautiful. Get it. Blast it. – Rick Saunders / Deep Blues
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Taledragger is sure one of the best blues releases this year. – Jason Felton / Record Dpt.
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All of the pieces fit well on this album, with Ford and the band developing a hypnotic groove, putting their own spin on original material and some fresh takes on blues standards. – Music & More
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Taledragger is a modern blues album with primitive roots. It’s a far more interesting recording because of its "impurities" — paradoxically, making it a far more "authentic" blues record because it is linked to multiple historic traditions simultaneously. It’s exponentially more enjoyable and exciting as blues than anything coming out of Chicago in the 21st century. – Thom Jurek / AMG
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The band gives T-Model’s music power and swing like he’s rarely had before. – Warren McQuiston / Performer Magazine
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Taledragger might conjure up the sound of classic pre-war blues, but closer analysis reveals an expertly crafted contemporary blues album with strict attention to Delta roots. – Rosalind Cummings-Yeates / Illinois Entertainer
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Its primitiveness, its utter lack of manners, is what makes Taledragger feel like it’s perversely true to the spirit of the blues. – The Hurst Review
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If you enjoy juke-joint jostlin’ and smoky-cool Delta blues, or if you’re captivated by their novelty, you’ll dig Taledragger. Especially “How Many More Years.” Hinging on a distorted, crunchy, low-end riff, it makes a perfect anthem for shooting heroin in a dive-bar bathroom. – Barry Thompson / Boston Phoenix
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Records documenting life and how to survive it only rarely sound as exhilarating as this – Tim Peacock / Whisperin & Hollerin / UK
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He’s backed by band members who are a third his age, all of them steeped not only in the blues, but grunge and trippy psychedelia. It’s a weird and winning fit. – Billings Gazette
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Melds the traditional with the modern in a way that would have most singer/songwriters falling flat on their faces. – James G. Carlson / No Depression
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This is roadhouse blues which is sharp and stinging. – Graham Reid / Elsewhere
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If you enjoy juke-joint jostlin’ and smoky-cool Delta blues, or if you’re captivated by their novelty, you’ll dig Taledragger. – Barry Thompson / Boston Phoenix
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Joyful noise and lascivious grace matter more than anything here, and Ford is full of enough of both to overflow a vessel twice the size of Taledragger. – Michael Toland / Sleazegrinder
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For anyone who craves the kernel at the core of blues-with-a-beat; a kernel at the heart of much great rock ‘n’ roll, Taledragger is essential. – Mary Leary / Blurt
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Shows an intensity you just don’t expect out of a 90 year old guy! – Guitar Omnivore
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Taledragger is a rollicking blend of Chicago groove, juke joint jump, Delta rawness, electric crunch and good o’ fashion "attitude." – J. Blake / American Blues News
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On Taledragger, I’m hearing one seamless band of great musicians. – Nine Bullets
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Pure unadulterated North Mississippi Hill Country style. – Boston Blues
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If you like Muddy, The Black Keys, RL Burnside, John Lee, Howlin’ Wolf, The Doors, Jon Spencer, Reigning Sound and so on, you’ll dig the sounds of T-Model Ford and his band GravelRoad. – Bruce Warren / WXPN Radio / Some Velvet Blog
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Keys & Chords (BE) | Gonzai (FR) | Rock Times (FR) | Blues Again! (FR) | Fnac Blog (FR)


T-MODEL FORD The Ladies Man PRESS

This album got did as it ought to be done. By feel and vibe. And that’s why I love it. – T-Model Ford Is Coming To Kick Your Asses / DEEP BLUES
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For this album, Ford sat in with a full band in a studio, and in spite of the fact that he seems more like a street corner brusker, the results are amazing. – Amy Randall / Round The Dial
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More eccentric than innovative, Ford revisits riffs and motifs well-known in both Delta and Chicago blues. But he has an advantage over ’30s performers, who were limited by the three-minute running time of 78-rpm records. Ford stretches out, driving such tunes as "Chicken Head Man" and "Hip Shaking Woman" past the six-minute mark. The guitarist slips, lurches and churns until the groove becomes hypnotic. T-Model Ford may not be an originator, but when he bends a song like taffy, he twists it into a shape that is his alone. – Mark Jenkins / Washington Post
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The Ladies Man showcases a collection of solid country blues as old as the style itself but owing allegiance to no one single influence. As Ford himself says, "I didn’t borrow from nobody, I went after ‘em…." – Reverend Keith A. Gordon / Blues About.com
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Ford’s seventh and arguably best record is his first all acoustic set. Cut in one day in Wichita, Kan., in 2008, with minimal accompaniment from sometime backing band GravelRoad (Ford split with longtime partner, drummer Tommy Lee “Spam” Miles, some years back), the session has none of the raucous punk energy with which he’s identified. Instead, he delivers warm, assured, and playful performances of old blues standards by Muddy Waters and Little Walter, and his own compositions, including the signature “Chicken Head Man.” – Mark Jordan / Go Memphis
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The Ladies Man is Mr. Ford’s seventh record, and it’s a good one for a couple reasons. Of course, the man himself is in rare form, his primitive yet evocative playing providing the perfect backdrop for his oh-so-familiar tales of woe and infidelity. With no second takes, no overdubs and negligible production values, this is as bare bones as music gets. Mr. Ford’s younger accomplices wisely remain in the background lest there be any questions as to whose show this is. The warts-and-all feel of the record greatly benefits from Mr. Ford’s skill as a storyteller, particularly in the rambling I’m Coming To Kick Yer Asses. Between gutshot blues numbers, the octogenarian singer bemoans his illiteracy, chronicles his introduction to his instrument at age 58 and explains that he’s unsure of his true age because two women stole his driver’s license. Seriously. And in between all that talking, he even finds some time to sing some of the low-down dirtiest acoustic blues you’ve ever had the pleasure of hearing, including the number that is sure to become his calling card, Chicken Head Man. So what are you waiting for? Get the record from Alive and be there when he comes to town, because like Mr. Ford says. "It’s Jack Daniels time!". – My Old Kentucky Blog
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T-Model Ford at the Deep Blues Festival – Photo by Peter Lee

This has the feel of a friendly field recording ALAN LOMAX style. A lot of soul is wrung from a cheap guitar over the course of this nearly hour’s worth of rappin’ and playin’. – Pirate Cat Radio
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Throughout the disc, Ford comes across as an engaging entertainer and storyteller, often making his asides and non sequitors just as entertaining as the songs. – Fuzztone Magazine
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The Ladies Man’s structure begs us to view T-Model Ford as a living legend, and after spending some time with these old-fashioned blues songs and Ford’s larger-than-life blues persona, it’s a hard claim to deny. – Tone Marrow
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As solid and dependable as his name-sake, T-Model Ford shows all the young guys (like the 60 year olds) how it’s supposed to be done on The Ladies Man. Long may he run. – Carl Hanni – Blurt
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"You’ve got to use yourself in happiness," he says. "I’m happy with my life, like I’m living. The ladies treat me nice, and the men treat me nice, too. Nobody wants to fight, so I’m happy with it." – Read T-Model Ford’s interview for The Memphis Flyer
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"Yeah, I played the acoustic on this one. But I still love my electric," says Ford. "I just go around, and if I hear a sound and I want to play it, I’ll play it." – T-Model For interview with Go Memphis
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Bluesmen like Ford, and his music, are a national treasure. If that’s not enough of a reason to buy and listen, then the great music will be. This is blues from the original mold. Enjoy. – Jim White / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
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T-Model Ford’s The Ladies Man has an endearing quality. It’s simply nice to know there’s still legitimate blues musicians actively making music. – Plug In Music
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Maybe it’s because playing music is so "new" to the man — he was nearly 60 when he began — but a country-blues sound this genuine and this alive in this century is the longest of long shots. — Duane Verh / Cleveland Scene
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The main influence on Ford’s music is Muddy Waters but spiced liberally with elements of North Mississippi Hill Country Blues – his lyrics borrowed from the blues canon and spliced together in Ford’s own unique way. – Michael Rainsford / Blues In Britain
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T-Model Ford isn’t nearly ready to retire : interview for Charlotte Creative Loafing
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T-Model Ford drives Delta blues to Somerville : interview with The Somerville Journal
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On The Ladies Man, T-Model Ford comes off more than ever as a living testament to the sustaining power of the blues (…) Ford’s first studio album for a new label shows him to be not just a survivor, but a solid rock supplying a living, breathing foundation for his brand of blues. – J. Allen / All Music Guide
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The informal recording session, planned at the last minute and plotted on the fly, finds Ford edging into each song as the mood and memory strike him. Two interview tracks further flesh out the character of this one-of-a-kind bluesman. – Hyperbolium
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He’s backed on this all-acoustic outing by a batch of younger musicians who are clued in enough to Ford’s aesthetic to keep things on the loose-and-gritty side, letting the rough side drag as the main man lays into tunes that combine the styles of his native Mississippi Delta region with a Chicago blues influence. – Limewire
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The Ladies Man has the relaxed feel of an informal jam session, a vibe that works to Ford’s advantage in emphasizing good times and a friendly atmosphere over tortured souls and visiting hellhounds. – Michael Toland / Sleazegrinder
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What he lacks in technique he makes up with swagger. "That’s Alright" is the best cut on the record, with Ford sounding like he’s been gargling swamp water laced with razor blades. – Grant Britt / Creative Loafing
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This spontaneous, let-it-rip-and-move-on way is typical of T-Model Ford‘s style. He doesn’t sound like he is in a hurry, but he also doesn’t seem to want to waste time on what he’s already said. Ford likes his blues, his women, his money, and his late-in-life fame. You’d think an acoustic record from a blues man would be a bit risky, but most likely he wouldn’t have wanted it any other way — or given a shit if anyone else did. – Mike Wood / Prefix Mag
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Acoustic blues played by 88-year-old blues veteran T-Model Ford along with young harmonicat Dustin Arbuckle, guitarists Stefan Zillioux and Aaron Moreland, and percussionists Martin Reinsel and Starr Harris. It was recorded, according to the insert, mostly in one take, with T-Model strumming and remembering and the younger folks joining in as arrangements coalesced (…) Blues fans need to grab this one. – Sun Herald
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Blues Is Job One : interview with T-Model Ford for The New Haven Advocate
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If you love hard, Delta blues, then this album will be among your favorites. – What’s Bluesdaddy Listening To?
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Gonzai (France) interview with T-Model | Playing Out Loud review (UK) | Les Inrocks (Fr)
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