The Sights Most of What Follows Is True out on CD, Vinyl & Digital

Most Of What Follows Is True
Most Of What Follows Is True
get the CD here
Yellow Vinyl ltd. edition
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Buy Now

Recorded, like every other Sights album, at Jim Diamond’s Ghetto Recorders, the band’s fourth shifts the emphasis away from the touchstone mod-psych sounds of the mid-‘60s toward the freewheelin’ rock-a-boogie of the early ‘70s. Their chosen musical path echoes with the distant footsteps of the Small Faces/Faces former band members Steve Marriott, with his short-lived supergroup Humble Pie, but especially Ronnie Lane’s solo work recorded in one of the first mobile recording studios down on his Welsh farm at Fishpool. Combining the jaunty piano/organ and sing-along tradition of British Musical Hall, Appalachian banjo, and violin with rock ‘n’ roll, the touching heart-on-sleeve ode to Baranek’s girlfriend “Maria”, for example, contains the essence of Lane’s pioneering sound.
Then there’s the blue-eyed soul shout, windmilling power chords, driving B4, coruscating guitar skirmishes, and boozy blues rock which provides the album’s sweaty counterpoint. Opener “How Do You Sleep?” is an infectious, tight ‘n’ loose, jamming boogie-party that’s continued on the excellent “Guilty” with fabulous pulsating Hammond organ balanced by punchy guest sax by Brad Stern, and the Band-inspired country-blues rock of “(Nose to the) Grindstone”. But make no mistake, this is a group effort. The two beautiful, melancholy country-pop songs written by Lawson—“I Left My Muse” and “Back to You”, both with teardrop pedal steel by Pete Ballard—along with Gordon Smith’s sole powerpop outing “Take & Take”, fit perfectly within the context of Most of What Follows Is True. Unsurprisingly, these guys have turned out to be honest-to-god rock-a-boogie racketeers. – Alan Brown / PopMatters
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The 2010 version of The Sights does have a different sound, as maturity takes a lead role here and there is no pressure built on Most Of What Follows Is True‘s success. This lets The Sights be who they want to be, as this was a record made out of the love for music and it comes through here on every 60′s influenced power pop nugget, every Detroit sounding garage stomper and even the steel pedal induced tracks all back up The Sights early hype and prove that their talent has never diminished. – The Fire Note
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Eddie Baranek (The Sights) photo by Patrick Boissel

It’s been five years – that’s over a generation in rock and roll years — and now Eddie Baranek is back with a new batch of Sights (…) I can’t say the wait has been worth it. Because it’s been too damn long! But every one of the 11 plays I’ve gone through of this album has been. Now if they would only detour down the turnpike on one of their semi-regular trips to Hipsterville, U.S.A. (a.k.a. Brooklyn) and give us a show. – David M. Snyder / Looking For The Magic
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Five years after the New Line album, the band has returned with its strongest effort yet. Leader Eddie Bararenk has found the sweet spot in his songwriting, harnessing the melody of British-influenced power pop to the R&B-fueled garage rock of the band’s earliest days with tighter craft than ever before. “Guilty,” “How Do You Sleep?” and “Hello to Everybody” should inspire as many singalongs as air guitar frenzies. Baranek also shows a fine touch with less frenetic pop with the rousing “3 Cheers,” the folky “Maria” and the country rocking ballad “Back to You.” He also shares the wealth, passing the pen and mic to bassist Dave Lawson for the jaunty “Tick Talk Lies” and the C&W-soaked “I Left My Muse,” both excellent additions to the Sights catalog. The band ends the record with the brash pop of “(Nose to the) Grindstone,” a statement of purpose for making music as a living in an industry set up to make that as difficult as possible. It’s a fitting end to an album reminding that industry that talent always prevails. – The Big Takeover
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Guilty : A jazz infused rock vibe makes this song a foot tapping, stomp fest. Highly enjoyable and enriched with lead singer/guitarist Eddie Baranek’s exceptional vocals, Guilty is a fun song. – The Rock and Roll Guru
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This is strong, rootsy, meat-and-potatoes rock & roll played with gravity, skill, and the enthusiasm of true fans. One spin Most of What Follows Is True leaves no doubt the Sights are still a band worth hearing, and if you like to hear great songs played with gravity, skill, and brio, this is one album you’ll have been waiting for. – Mark Deming / AMG
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The band comes out of the gate with the guitar-heavy "How Do You Sleep?" sounding like a mix between The Creation and Blue Cheer while "Hello to Everybody" is a charging power pop nugget which doesn’t forget the humor ("Well I tried suicide but it wasn’t for me, it got to be a little too trendy"). A few tunes add some nifty pedal steel ("I Left My Muse" and "Back to You") while the jangly "Maria" adds a nice Beatles touch to the proceedings (and "Happy" is pure 1967 Who with those opening Keith Moon-esque thundering drum fills).
Baranek proudly wears his influences on his sleeve but when the attention to songcraft is this detailed you won’t hear too much complaining. Their best yet. – Tim Hinely / Blurt
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Much of The Sights’ first three records play like grinning, raucous romps through dusty record shops, spinning everything from blues to latter-British-invasion to mustachioed, solo-indulgent ’70s rock. Most of What Follows is True, with its sporadic brow-raising bluntness in autobiographical lyricism, could be the most illuminating, or at least heartfelt, Sights album yet. Musically, it’s simultaneously fresh, yet worn and comfortable, with three new members flexing their idiosyncrasies in instrumental inflection and switching off lead singing/writing. It’s still flat-out rock ‘n’ roll, but noticeably, on Baranek’s pieces, more candid. – Real Detroit Weekly
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The Sights’ latest release is an explosion of tuneful power-pop gems that conjure up ‘60s British masters like The Kinks and (dare I say) The Beatles. They stretch out on a few songs to dip into Country and some blue-eyed Soul. A remarkable comeback. – Pirate Cat Radio
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Awesome opening track "How Do You Sleep" may sound like it was recorded 35 years ago, but it, along with much of the record, transcends any era trappings and feels current, and kicks ass. – Losing Today
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Most of What Follows Is True does sound as if it could’ve been recorded between 1972 and 1974 — the hints of Badfinger, Ronnie Lane and the Who ("It’s not a rock ‘n’ roll record without at least three Who riffs," Baranek says) are there. But it’s a Sights album, top to bottom. It’s the kind of rock ‘n’ roll that kids could latch on to and dig — it’s got youth, spirit, hooks, big guitars and folk and pop — classic power peppered with gentle persuasion and sing-along subtlety. It’s anything but Fall Out Boy. – Metro Times
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