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With a healthy horn section and plenty of hand claps, Thirst bursts in with a vivacious, infectious energy and vigour that is frankly impossible to avoid. Punctuated with the Strummer scream and swagger of vocalist Carter Sharp, it’s bold and brassy (literally) tearing through the decades to birth a seductive mash-up of an album. With such big moves and big sounds, we can only expect big things. – Rachel Williams / Artrocker
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#9 Waves Of Fury – Thirst. – Live4ever’s Essential Listening 2012: The Debut Albums
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Everything from punk to goth to jazz, psychedelia and space rock is heard on this beast. It’s clearly one of the most unique blends you will ever hear. It’s also quite a tasty disc. – Music Street Journal
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Waves of Fury’s debut is much like hooking up with someone in a nightclub toilet – it’s fast, thrilling, a bit awkward, a bit messy and at the end you smooth down your ruffled hair, check your reflection and go back to dancing to ‘Louis Louis’. Great stuff. – Marc Burrows / Drowned In Sound
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The impression is of a band with an acute understanding of their chosen musical lineage, with every horn parp, handclap and howled yelp expertly positioned and hitting its target. – Chris Buckle / The Skinny
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A damn fine piece of contemporary rock & soul with a burning flame of Spiritualized and The Mary Chain at its core. – Female First
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The charmingly-titled "I Don’t Know What To Make Of Your Fucked Up Friends" sums up this brief 30-minute album. It’s a brass-infused classic rock banger. – Der Goatsden
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Take all the things that make the classic Phil Spector records so amazingly great and bring them bang up to date. – Faded Glamour
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A garage rock tour de force. The absolutely perfect production starkly contrasts the recklessness of the performances. It’s like a pristine recording of a gang fight. – Boston Blues
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Waves Of Fury bring you the sound of the future. A Molotov cocktail of raincoat post-punk, industrial funk and early ’80s ‘own-label’ scuzz, twitching with fidgety riffling and blending together echoes of shoegazer angst, Motown beats, The Fall and the Inca Babies. – Dave Collins / Vive Le Rock
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Like the Supremes with Joe Strummer on vocals … :
Meet Waves of Fury, a south London band who played their first ever gig at Ginglik, Shepherd’s Bush, in April 2011 and self-released their download EP Blood in Fury in September, only to be hailed as "indie jazz-rock". Since then, they have found inspiration touring America’s southern states, moved to Somerset, recorded an album at PJ Harvey’s studio in Bristol, and become the first British act to be signed by Black Keys’ label Alive Naturalsound. Using ProTools and professional musicians, they have found a way to reconcile their twin passions: Stooges and Stax, garage and soul, rock’n'roll’s trash aesthetic and the exuberance and jubilation of old-style R&B. – The Guardian / Band Of The Day
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The Waves of Fury are a five piece from Somerset with a penchant for taking classic Rn’B influences and atomising them through a filter of mangled guitar distortion whilst at the same time blending them with rich soaring brass riffs ala The Memphis Horns.  The result is Thirst a début album that deserves to be on every single one of the soon to be ubiquitous ‘best of” lists of 2012. To call it “Psychocandy” with horns may be something of an overstatement, but it certainly contains the same explosive incendiary combination of noise, melody, and classic pop hooks proving that like the Reid brothers, these guys certainly know their musical history. – The VPME / – Interview/ Review
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With smart lyrics and an authentic passion for their style, Waves Of Fury’s ‘Thirst’ delivers a unique and fresh sonic experience. Distorted, fuzzed-out and maxed-out, Waves Of Fury takes their tight rhythms and piercing high notes all way down into the gutter and gets really, really dirty with them. It’s sweaty, crazy and oh-so-good… – Rustzine
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Soul music often seemed to reach for the divine, but paradoxically, Thirst through its raw execution, seems to sink its arms deep down down into the Earth. – Punknews
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Waves Of Fury is a brashy, balls to the wall band from Somerset, and this is their debut album, Thirst. They have already made a good impression with me with their single Businessman’s Guide To Witchcraft, a track that combined the dirtiest rock with some pretty gnarly horns, and managed to make ‘em sound good. Really good. – Elusive Comments
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Introducing … Waves Of Fury. – 247 Magazine
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Plentifully awash with showpiece guitars and motown horns (yes, a British guitar group who embrace horns, what took them so long?) that cut through fiercely incoherent yet powerful vocals, ‘Businessman’s Guide to Witchcraft’ harks back to the dawn of upbeat rock n roll from the sixties, sounding like a messier version of The Loved Ones with the instrumental sensibilities of The Clash. – Live4ever
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Most appositely described as a Motown-tinged Jesus & Mary Chain, they’ve somehow managed to not only mash but mesh together the splenetic, fuzzy guitars and anguished howl of East Kilbride’s finest with the most celebratory horn section heard on a record for… well, a while. – Modern Life Is Rubbish
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A Motown Mary Chain. This lot seem to seamlessly meld garage rock with old-style RnB together. Think The 101ers shoved into The Clash. Or if Sonic Youth collaborated with Marvin Gaye. – This Machine Kills Fascists
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Picture a head-on musical collision between the Stooges via the Funhouse era and a Stax soul revue, and you’re not far off from Waves of Fury’s Thirst. – Stereokiller
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An album drenched with soul, undoubtedly upbeat and dripping with both that Motown drive that is irresistibly hard to keep still to and the lo-fi aggression of eighties garage rock that cuts across you as you listen to it. – Musicomh
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Plentifully awash with showpiece guitars and motown horns (yes, a British guitar group who embrace horns, what took them so long?) that cut through fiercely incoherent yet powerful vocals, ‘Businessman’s Guide to Witchcraft’ harks back to the dawn of upbeat rock n roll from the sixties, sounding like a messier version of The Loved Ones with the instrumental sensibilities of The Clash. – Live4ever
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They somehow make the unusual concoction of styles blend effortlessly. Never before would I have thought that The Sex Pistols should have collaborated with Marvin Gaye! – Altsounds
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Has a Rolling Stones swagger… it’s like Steppenwolf jamming with The Commodores and is every bit as magnificent as that alliance should be. – God Is In The TV
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Ever tried a food dish that shouldn’t have worked but somehow does? I’m thinking mushy peas and ice cream on the same plate. Well – Waves of Fury are much the same. They have been likened to a mix of Wilson Pickett and The Midnight Movers but without Wilson and with Iggy Pop or Joe Strummer on vocals. Sounds a bit crazy? Well it is – but it WORKS. – Musiceyz
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WoF really don’t sound that much like anyone else. The closest comparison is probably to the jazzier numbers on The Clash’s London Calling, but this is far, far weirder. Lead single ‘Businessman’s Guide to Witchcraft’, released next week, manages to tie soulful piano and razor-edged horn stabs to raging, spitting vocals and noisy guitar – it sounds improbable and unpleasant, but, incredibly, it works wonders. – The New Thing
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Waves Of Fury – ‘Businessman’s Guide to Witchcraft’(****)
Scuzzy proto-punk in the vein of Iggy Pop morphing into a Motown-beat driven garage track. Sounds like a mess; but this isn’t impossibly cluttered, it’s impossibly good. All bursts of horn and screeching vocals – it sounds like a forgotten gem from the Ace Records catalogue, but it’s brand new. B-Side Papa Sam sees them move into Jesus and Mary Chain territory, all wailing and soundscape-y rock’n'roll vocals. If you need a ‘tune’, whack this on the stereo. – Nicholas Burman / Artrocker
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Track Of The Day – Waves Of Fury – ‘Businessman’s Guide to Witchcraft’
Memo to Mark Ronson, THIS is how add horns and make them sound uber cool. A fantastic, spellbinding single that deserves to be the ultimate floor filler at every Indie disco across this greedy and unpleasant land. – The VPME
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It’s bold, it’s charming and it’s completely mad. – Amazing Blog
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The new single from the hotly tipped Waves of Fury just about ticks all the ‘cool’ boxes. There’s a drawling, almost incomprehensible vocal; a ridiculously epic brass section that you think must be cribbed from a little known Motown single from the late ‘60s; fuzzy guitars; a moody bassline… There are handclaps and everything. It’s almost as if they’ve run a focus group consisting of Iggy Pop, Phil Spector, Robbie Williams and Isaac Hayes. And it really works. It somehow manages to sound brooding and euphoric at the same time. – Aberdeen Student Radio Blog
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The Waves Of Fury are a London based trashy raw garage rock soul band that weld together dirty fuzzy garage riffs, motown horns and feral vocals to create one of the most potent, energetic and down right viciosus sounds I’ve heard in bloody ages. – Rhythm & Booze
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Falling between goth gaze and zombie rock, Waves of Fury’s single Businessman’s Guide To Witchcraft is all Stax Horns and angular shouting. Pil Spector anyone? – The Guardian
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One part Jesus and Mary Chain with their fuzzy guitars, one part Iggy & The Stooges with the proto-punk vocals. And another part a blustering brass orientated and djembe noodling world music act (not forgetting the pianos). – The Monitors
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The Waves Of Fury is a multi-faceted and layered groove machine. – Ring Master
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A full assault on the senses. Lou Reed, Iggy & The Stooges, the New York Dolls influences are clear. A sonic treat! 10/10 – Blast 1386
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Alive Naturalsound Home Page | The Waves Of Fury official site



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