click here for tour dates


Buy Now

The Throes CD
CD Digipak remastered
Nothing To You CD EP
I’m Her Man/Fail Hard (live) 7"
Buy Now
Buy Now
Buy Now
Buy Now

Check TYSON VOGEL solo project DEVOTIONALS

PRESS

 

A band that cribs its name from a James Joyce story are always going to attract a certain level of disdain; but get past their clever-clogs appellation and there’s a deeply wrought cask of oak-lined Americana-blues. Sounding like the missing link between wailing Jack/monged Meg and Ol’ Dirty Beard Banhart, songs like ‘You Losin’ Out’ and ‘Fail Hard to Regain’ are stomping rackets that have the demeanour of a hard-drinking song and the heart of a hopeless romantic. Stating their influences as ranging from San Francisco punk-rockers Operation Ivy through to backcountry stalwarts in the mould of Skip James and Clarence Ashley, Two Gallants understand just how much bite to add to their Southern-stew without it losing its distinctive texture; a sweat-blues gumbo that could have just as easily emerged from New Orleans or Seattle. Throw down! – Boomkat
———————–

San Francisco’s gritty bards deliver timeless stories of desperation on stunning debut. Pulling their name from a James Joyce story not only speaks to Two Gallants’ ambition, but to their lived-in, timeless sound. These folk-punk troubadours, Adam Stephens (guitar/vocals/harmonica) and Tyson Vogel (drums) began their journey in 2002 playing impromptu gigs outside San Francisco’s public transportation terminals. The band’s desperately emotive debut, ‘The Throes’, is the stuff rail riders and Kerouac would have rave about, delivered in a drunken Pogues-meet-Dylan-on-amphetamines mess of wonder. Songs like "My Madonna" and "Nothing To You" highlightStephen’s ability to craft rustic tales of life at the bottom of America’s food chain, heavy on the drinking and heavy on the regret. Pour a drink and try to keep your tears out of it. – Aaron Kayce / Paste (4 stars)
———————–

The most essential record of the year, so far. – Rough Trade (UK)
‘The Throes’ also made Rough Trade’s top 100 list of 2005 at #13.
———————–

I first saw Two Gallants in my kitchen about two years back, which is not an uncommon story. A lot of folks first came into contact with this band in their kitchen or a friend’s kitchen or on a corner somewhere in San Francisco. And that’s proper, since this is the most homespun band to come along in a good while. The finger style guitar that propels the melody makes one think of Elizabeth Cotton or Mississippi John Hurt, people who’ve been dead a long while, people who were genuine folk musicians. What I mean by folk musicians is that Cotton and Hurt didn’t learn to play off records. They learned to play from folks in their community. Folk music is from the folks, not from the machine. And the Two Gallants have tapped into that sap of genuineness. – Read Collin Ludlow-Mattson’s article about Two Gallants in SF Mesh magazine — ‘Here They Come To Save The Day’
———————–

Hey, it’s two good-looking dudes from San Francisco that’s sound exactly like backwoods-ugly dudes from Nebraska (in the best possible way). Think Springsteen playing ‘Nebraska’ style business for the rest of his days (isn’t it nice to forget about that Hanks AIDS’ stuff?) and, instead of the Conan O’Brien guy, he drafted the dude from Cro-Mags to keep the beat. – Vice magazine (7" review – rating = 9)
———————–

CMJ 2005: Bands On The Run
The Two Gallants proved to be another of the sort of band one hopes to discover at CMJ, something with obvious staying power. A guitar and drums two-piece that applies heavy volume to a blend of country, folk and blues in a manner reminiscent of the early work of "No Depression" genre pioneers Uncle Tupelo, they’re from San Francisco, though their Americana sound suggests the South or Midwest. It’s no surprise they’ve just signed to the highly successful Nebraska independent label Saddle Creek. – Tricia McDermott / CBS news
———————–_

CMJ hangover post : Two gallants was definitely the best show i saw. i could watch them over and over and over and over again. i saw them in april and was pretty much transfixed despite the fact i didn’t know any songs at the time. seriously, if i make a list of best shows of ’05 – they might be #1. they’re like neil young/kurt cobain/alt rock goodness. – Daily Refill
———————–

CMJ Weekend : on Friday were Two Gallants. They put on one of the best performances we saw all week. With just drums and a guitar with Adam Stevenson’s distressed voice, they played a set of contemporary Dylanesque Americana that was remarkably articulate and precise. From everything we heard this week, these two are the most likely to go on and stand the test of time. – Gothamist
———————–

If rock music is all about transience, how can a song born decades ago still rev up the engines of romance? "Tangled Up in Blue", for instance, is a tale of fading love, but the power and significance of the song itself is timeless. Rock ‘n’ roll is often an expression of youth or youth’s passing, but when music (or any art) endures, its magnetism is only amplified with the passage of years. For that reason, and because the best songs are usually pinned by the listener to some quintessential moment, the classics become classic. Passion is a fleeting feeling, but the best art will evoke that feeling with every exposure. So when youth produces a work of such force, when the raw or supposedly naïve artist comes up with something universal, critics and fans rejoice. We want to latch on to a beautiful thing before its green genius withers under the glare of success. Such is the case with Two Gallants’ debut The Throes. The San Francisco duo responsible for this gut-wrenching musical tragedy both just turned 21, yet somehow their musical hindsight extends far beyond recent memory and taps into a rusty vein swollen with grief, heartache and violent desperation. – Pitchfork Media (rating : 8.5)
———————–

On this San Francisco duo’s debut, childhood pals Adam Stephens and Tyson Vogel channel early-twentieth-century blues, folkies such as Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen, and current indie punk-and they play all the instruments. Highlight: the brutally witty Irish-folk-flavored title ballad. – Rolling Stone (***)
———————–

The Violent Femmes are a fondly remembered band for many. With spiky, short and mostly acoustic rock, played primarily by a three piece band, their biggest problem was listenability – a whole album grew to be tough work. Two Gallants, two 21 year olds, who provide all the drums, guitar, vocals and harmonica, fix that in one sweep on their remarkable debut. For anyone who prefers Johnny Cash to punk, this is how the White Stripes should sound, like a less bluesy Black Keys. The sound is raw and exciting, made by two men who’ve known each other since they were 5 – every move is anticipated, every venture supported by the other. If early Dylan had found himself sitting in the studio with Ryan Adams, something like this may have resulted. Excellent, country-blues tinged genius at play, captured perfectly – with enough madness and spikiness to recall greats like Creedence Clearwater Revival, Leonard Cohen and the Violent Femms at their best. ACE rating 9/10. – Mike Rea / Adult Contemporary (UK). Made the 2005 Best list : If early Dylan had found himself sitting in the studio with Ryan Adams, something like this may have resulted. Excellent, country-blues tinged genius at play, captured perfectly – with enough madness and spikiness to recall greats like Creedence Clearwater Revival, Leonard Cohen and the Violent Femmes at their best. For anyone who prefers Johnny Cash to punk, this is how the White Stripes should sound.
———————–

MORE PRESS HERE

Alive Naturalsound Home Page | Two Gallants Alive site | Two Gallants official site | Management : DKasinmgmt


Bomp Records

black keys
radio moscow
T-Model Ford



Contact