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Cincinnati-based power trio Buffalo Killers have been laying down rootsy Americana rock since 2006. Their latest album is the THC-inspired Ohio Grass. (…) I would advise having some weed rolled and ready to achieve the full Ohio Grass experience. It will also aid in preparing the mind for the hypnotic reggae vibes of "Golden Eagle." – Celebstoner

Cincinnati’s Buffalo Killers are an intriguing band. They sound like everyone at once, from the Rolling Stones, Black Crowes, and Mountain to White Album-era Beatles by turns, with tons of tasty electric guitars and three-part harmonies galore. Ohio Grass is a case in point. Originally released on green vinyl as a six-song EP in the spring of 2013 and then expanded with an additional studio track and three live tracks for release on black vinyl and CD at the end of the summer, it shows a band whose members seem to be able to do anything they choose. It’s tempting to call them a power trio, and they are, a bit like Cream or the James Gang sometimes, but they’re also capable of a Beatlesque power pop sound, too, and track after track here surprises, each sounding somehow old and familiar while also sounding fresh and new. The opener, "Baptized," sounds like Alice in Chains channeling Black Sabbath, while "Nothing Can Bring Me Down" sounds like a great lost Big Star track, and the original EP’s closer, "Some Other Kind," actually sounds like a Beatles White Album outtake. The bonus studio cut, "Good Feeling," is pure power pop, and everything here has a wonderfully loose crunch to it, rough and ragged and yet tight as a drum, too. – Steve Leggett / All Music Guide

This collection of atmospheric psychedelia is laced with the swamp blues of the Killers’ first three outings, coupled with a mature, melodic folk nuance sure to have you reaching for your lava lamp. (…) Brilliantly sequenced, organically produced, and genuinely executed, Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. cements Buffalo Killers’ reputation for ’70s-infused tunes in a postmodern package and plants the seeds for growth on new musical horizons. –
John Castino / Innocent Words

Buffalo Killers have long hair, beards and a wonderful new tune "Hey Girl" that harkens back to ’60s psychedelia, CSNY hooks and lava-lamp love. Even though the song possesses a delightfully flowery vibe, "Hey Girl" packs a delicious punch that’s filled with more than your average acid tablets. The Cincinnati band’s new single has a hell of a lot of heart. – Spinner

On Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. the band has made an album that sounds like it came out 40 years ago but for one big difference: it’s concise. The longest song is 4:44, and most are around the three minute mark. Opener “Get It” (which made me holler “Oh, Shit!” the first time I listened to it) could’ve been twice as long and would still be worth every second. Despite writing heavy riffs that can turn mountains into volcanoes, they don’t pummel you the way most power trios tend to (we’re looking at you Mountain, Blue Cheer, Gov’t Mule). Songs like “Blood on Your Hands” and “I Am Always Here” show a gift for creating memorable, hooky songs that recall the best of Steven Stills (dude was a beast before the coke took hold, seriously), only louder. – Warren McQuiston / Performer Magazine

Steeped in ’70s classic rock, their terrific new album Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. features harmonies clearly culled from their past. – Working-Class Heroes / Clevescene

Their sound could be compared to any psychedelic band from the late 60′s early 70′s, but they engrave their own edge to each track that makes it anything but a throwback. The standout of the album, for me, is "Get It." The gritty guitars and methodic drumming make the track a suitable opener for an album that is impossible not to groove to. – Soaked In Sound

A terrific, and very welcome, record. – WYMA

The album features the band’s raucous blues-rock sound, which harkens back to the classic rock era. “Get It,” a rollicking number complete with twangy electric guitar solos, is loud and wild and will likely make you crave a beer. Preferably from a dive bar in the South. – RCRD LBL

Hailing from Cincinnati, Ohio, Buffalo Killers have been trading their swampy, smoky sound for several years now. Having their last release produced by Black Key Dan Auerbach did them no harm and they’ve collaborated with Black Crowe Chris Robinson and Kelly Deal from The Breeders in the recent past. New album, – Dig. Sow. Love. Grow., sees them expand on their Southern Rock/Haight Ashbury slow burn. – Louder Than War

The band hits noticeably harder this time out, and these ten songs sound less like the work of a bunch of Laurel Canyon refugees and more like the proud Midwesterners they really are. [Their last album] 3 sounded as if the Buffalo Killers were reaching for something bigger and grander than they’d attempted on their first two albums; Dig. Sow. Love. Grow., on the other hand, is a simpler and more organic effort that suggests these guys just want to rock, but it succeeds well enough to be as satisfying as its predecessor. – Mark Deming / All Music

The fourth album by Ohio’s own Buffalo Killers is another stellar collection of retro rock, heavy on the guitars, with lots of hooks, and a classic rock vibe that could only be stronger if the incense were burning and you were sitting with your girlfriend in the back of a ’68 Dodge listening to it on 8 track while the two of you shared a bottle of Boone’s Farm. For my money, the best rock band to emerge in the 21st century thus far. I’ve been listening to this kind of music my whole life. That’s why they call it classic. – The Record Changer

The boys rediscovered the volume knobs on their equipment when recording Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. Yup, this James Gangsian number was intended to be played only one way, and that’s loud. – My Old Kentucky Blog

Sweet ass 70′s style psych rock from a couple former members of Thee Shams. It’s their 4th full length album and I’m thinking it might just be their best. – Fraser`s One Album You Gotta Buy This Week

Buffalo Killers sound just as American as their name. Brothers Zachary and Andrew Gabbard, plus Joseph Sebaali, bring the full-force blues rock. “Get It,” off Dig. Sow. Love. Grow., is gritty, loud and will no doubt beg the comparison to a handful of contemporary blues-rock bands like former tourmates the Black Keys and the North Mississippi Allstars. – Magnet

With their latest album, Dig. Sow. Love. Grow., brothers Andy and Zachary Gabbard and Joseph Sebaali return with a no-frills production that sounds instantly familiar and is infused with a depth and honesty conspicuously absent on many modern releases. – Kyle Melton / Dayton City Paper

[5 OUT OF 5 STARS] Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. sees the band absolutely stampeding back to their raucous rock sound, but it also goes the extra step by showcasing both the majestic side of the Buffalo Killers, while managing to convey the overwhelming and unbridled power of the group. The band, which features brothers Zachary (bass and vocals) and Andrew (guitar and vocals) Gabbard, as well as drumming monster Joseph Sebaali, most certainly draws influence from a wide catalog of rock and roll’s elite. But Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. isn’t just another retro-sounding album that mimics bands of yesteryear. It’s a raw, real and commanding sound forged from grit that is as wide and expansive as the western plains, and is as mighty as it’s namesake. Simply put, it’s f**king awesome. – Brian Johnson / Marquee Magazine

This is rough and tumble, dirty south, throwback blues rock done right. – Alan Cross: A Journal Of Musical Thing

Whether it’s chemically, electrically or organically produced — or induced for that matter — the heavy rock of Buffalo Killers’ Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. packs a wallop. – Roy Kasten / KDHX Radio

From the first ringing chord and cymbal crash, Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. is a freshly fueled two-ton truck, hauling a fertile stash of sounds that incorporate the Allman Brothers’ dual-guitar slither and Joe Walsh’s knowing snarl. ‘Course, since these sounds were born, more or less, in the ‘70s, Buffalo Killers have the ability to make anyone who digs those sounds feel as comfy as we did during Dazed and Confused’s first scene. – Mary Leary / San Diego Reader

If you are already a fan Dig. Sow. Love. Grow. represents one of the Buffalo Killers best efforts yet and should be the record that gives them the exposure they most certainly deserve! – The Fire Note

It’s this attention to detail and these subtle nuances that make Dig, Sow, Love, Grow an ideal starting point for newcomers to the band, although those that pick up an earlier album first certainly aren’t setting themselves up for disappointment either. – The Active Listener

The variations in style and influence come very subtly though, and are made cohesive by the vocal work of Zachary and Andrew Gabbard, the burly bearded brothers who are this unit’s creative forces. – Campus Circle

There’s a great mixture of ’60s psychedelia, blues, Americana, garage rock, as well as some folk rock. If you’re looking for a band that can transport you back a few decades with their music, then look no further. – Inspirer Magazine

The sound is more than old school Americana rock, there is a psychedelic twist to it and something of the seventies vibe that followed the initial burst of psychedelics, something laid back. – Vanguard Online

This is a band that plays guitar based rock & roll with a heavy heap of vocal harmonies – with an emphasis on songwriting, and dynamic instrumental interplay. They play what they love in the fashion they are able, and what we are given is a soulful stew of excellent songcraft, and quality rock – whether it was recorded this year or in 1969 matters not a bit. The songs are melodic and memorable, the vocals a classic example of what happens when brothers sing together, and they have a drummer who often comes dangerously close to rolling off the rails with a strange, and unpredictable syncopation that makes me smile as I remember Levon Helm. What I really like is the fact that we may be in the presence of a new and genuine American guitar hero. Andy Gabbard is an encyclopedia of cool guitar tones, chord changes, fills, and solos. – Rock Guitar Daily

Once again the trio draws on a blend of Americana, garage rock, folk and psychedelia for this recording. – Relix

Dig, Sow, Love, Grow could have dropped in 1972 or ’73 and it would have fit in just fine. Rather than reproducing the retro vibe of the era, Buffalo Killers seem utterly unselfconscious about their sound. The album has a melange of almost familiar sounds: the Led Zeppelin opening to Get It that slides into a bluesy rock jam, the 13th Floor Elevators garage psychedelia of Hey Girl, the lazy folky groove of The Band on Blood On Your Hands, or heavy Joe Walsh punch of Those Days. Lazy tempos give the heady guitar riffs plenty of room to meander. – Jester Jay: music and other essential thoughts

It’s no surprise that Buffalo Killlers keeps impressing industry insiders. If you take a step back and look at what they have accomplished it’s easy to see that they are easily one of Cincinnati’s most succesful bands. – Cincy Music

Catching up with: Buffalo Killers. – Garin Pirnia / Metromix Cincinnati

While each of the 10 songs give nod to an array of influences from the ‘60s and ‘70s, unlike so many other bands today, Buffalo Killers are no ‘throwback’ act; they’ve taken elements of their influences and completely made it their own. Dig. Sow. Love. Grow is a master class display of the band’s solid ability to write a decent tune, which never conforms to formulaic writing or clichés. – My Sound Advice

The band has always espoused virtues from late ’60s psychedelia, blues, Americana, garage rock and the folk-rock sounds that rolled out of Laurel Canyon in the early ’70s, and especially on ‘Get It’ it sounds like such a concentrated mojo is bound to work for them. – Sonic Masala

Buffalo Killers 3 PRESS

The Killers’ style has been compared to The Band, Traffic and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. You can hear those influences on the new record. – Classic Rock / Track Of The Day
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Blessing Your Devil Soul: Farming the Buffalo Killers with Zach Gabbard. – interview for The Waster
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‘Circle Day’ video – NME
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Buffalo Killers have outdone themselves on this, their third long player. Building upon the quieter moments found on the Cincinnati trio’s previous outing, Let It Ride, the boys have found freedom in the laid-back country-rock grooves familiar to those of us who get their kicks listening to Neil Young and Crazy Horse.
With a little hickory twang provided by lap-steel player Sven Khans and banjoist Ryan Wells on a number of songs, especially ‘All Turn To Cloud’, the Killers’ loose arrangements and perfect harmonies create mellow mood pieces that ooze thick and sweet as molasses from the speakers. ‘Spend My Last Breath’ is a beautiful melancholic love song cloaked in the haunting tones usually heard on murder ballads, while ‘Circle Day’ adds a touch of glam stomp to the plaintive country reflection.
A seductive listen and a real contender for album of the year.
Happening Magazine/Shindig!
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"Huma Bird" goes down easy like a classic slice of American pie while Kelley Deal, sister of Pixies bassist Kim Deal, joins the revelry in "Could Never Be," the closest to an epic journey that 3 can offer. In the spirit of electric kool-aid and acid exams, they jaunt happily to winds of fuzzy Americana with airy guitar more fit for the open road, and probably a couple scenes in The Big Chill. – Lara Kinne / LEO Weekly
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Buffalo Killers interview with Hear Nebraska
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This album is made to chill out, with a headband or two – and to revive sweet spirit of rock and roll :) HIGHLY recommended to fans of neospychedelic rock and bands such as James Gang, Blue Cheer, The Guess Who, Led Zeppelin, Free, Buffalo Springfield and other. – Vibrant Sound of Acid
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Buffalo Killers interview with The Pitch/Wayward Blog
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Buffalo Killers’ sound harks back to the late 60′s/early 70′s when rock bands such as CSN&Y, The Band, Poco and The Rolling Stones were beginning to tinge their rock with a touch of country, but also holds its own melodically against the cream of current college rockers. Best exemplified on anthemic album opener and previous single Huma Bird, (which seems to be on permanent rotation in my head), and the stop/start rhythm of Everyone Knows It But You. – Duncan Fletcher / Subba Cultcha
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Joining the Killers on their journey through the past are Kelley Deal, Brian Olive, and James Leg, but even if this is a very Ohio-centric cast of characters, this music has a rich West Coast feel, and in this case, that’s a good thing. Buffalo Killers 3 finds this band easing into an comfortable but deep groove, and not many bands have mined a late hippie-era approach with more satisfying results. – Mark Deming / All Music Guide
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Maybe that’s a wily reflection on their band name but, boy, do these guys ever have their vintage Buffalo Springfield sound down pat, with a scoop of classic Neil Young mixed in to make everything go down smooth. Luckily for them, they somehow manage to transcend the comparison by managing to paradoxically come up with their own twangy sound, as witnessed by songs like the short and sweet “Everyone Knows It But You” and the utterly amiable “Circle Day” which is sloppy enough to have a choppy verve and swerve all its own. For what it’s worth, there’s something happening here. What it is, is exactly clear. – Jeffrey Morgan (SIZZLING PLATTER OF THE WEEK)
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You wouldn’t be alone in thinking this Cincinnati band’s third album was a long-lost James Gang platter. Not only is the band a power trio, but the vocals have the same keening tone Joe Walsh brought to “Walk Away,” and the band’s rhythm section finds the sorts of grooves once laid down in “Funk #49.” All of which isn’t meant to suggest that the Buffalo Killers are a carbon copy, but that their music is anchored unapologetically in the rock (not rock ‘n’ roll) music of the post-Woodstock ‘60s and pre-punk ‘70s. It’s the moment just before rock music became bloated and faced a DIY backlash, a time when the hangover from psychedelia, thick guitars, heavy bass, instrumental prowess and production craft hadn’t fallen into self-seriousness and arena bombast. A similar strain of rock emerged in the mid-90s, but egos and self-consciousness quickly overwhelmed the music; the Buffalo Killers avoid these pitfalls by remaining relatively unknown (and thus not fashionable), and more importantly, more interested in music than the congratulations. – Hyperbolium
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A first-rate Cincy trio whose influences run from Southern swamps to Topanga Canyon, applying a vintage psychedelic haze to a fine blues-rock mesh, suggesting the James Gang and another bison outfit, Buffalo Springfield. – Minneaplolis City Pages
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The Buffalo Killers successfully bridge the rock eras here with 3 and place a modern indie spin on a style of music that has been with us for a very long time. It is an album that sounds better after repeat plays and most certainly is perfect for just sitting back and letting the Buffalo Killers build your musical landscape in all their rock grander! – The Fire Note
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Influences are still all over "3," but a confident, engaged pop sensibility is fully in charge. Abundant with short gems, "3" unabashedly embraces added colors of steel guitar, banjo, saxophone, trippy keyboards and Kelley Deal’s voice (on the plaintive track "Could Never Be," which sounds like an outtake from Neil Young’s "After the Gold Rush"). Other highlights include the psychedelic "Lily of the Valley"; a hint of Gram Parsons in "All Turn to Cloud"; and the gorgeous, enigmatic "Everyone Knows It But You." – The Seattle Times
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3 harbours more quiet moments than psych wigouts – therefore more reminiscent of Neil Young and his spiritual brethren Crazy Horse fucking things up (think a less drunken, more thought-provoking Tonight’s The Night…). Its pretty tasty stuff. – Sonic Masala
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I can’t help but to hear a tad bit of YARDBIRDS and CREAM shining through on this… A bit psychedelic, but all rock and/or roll. – Thwart
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The trio’s uniqueness coming to the fore in a way that betters previous studio attempts, a high flying melancholy drifting hither and yon, an updraft into both sunlight and gray, lovely and tender in all the right measures. – Dennis Cook / Dirty Impound
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Zachary Gabbard (bass), Andrew Gabbard (guitar) and Joseph Sebaali (drums) know their way around this music, and they pull it off wonderfully. The Gabbard brothers create a vocal sound that brings back thoughts of The Who. Influences of The Byrds and The Rolling Stones are also dominant. – Buzzbin Magazine
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It’s taken awhile for the Buffalo Killers to find their softer side, but they are better men for it. – The Agit Reader
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3 treads a more Americana style than heard in the Buffalo Killers’ previous works, and this stronger country-rock vibe, aided by pedal steel and banjo, blends well with their early 70′s rock soaked sounds. Standouts among the 12 tracks include opener "Huma Bird", "All Turn To Cloud", and closer "Could Never Be." – SMarx / Record Dpt.
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Whereas the band’s previous albums where loud, proud and in-your-face, 3 is much more reserved; as their core, trippy neo-psychedelia fused sound, is rich with hazy melodies and soft rock undertones. – Chybucca Sounds
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Sincerity is underrated, and a band that rocks for real is too great a thing to loose. – Live review / Phoenix New Times
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Review of "3" on Planet Gong (FR) | Review of "3" on Raw Power Magazine (FR) |
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This hairy trio has created a retro rock album that somehow avoids sounding derivative. They touch base with 1970s rock, late Beatles and Crazy Horse-vintage Neil Young but when has that ever been a bad thing Let It Ride starts slowly with grimy soul and garage blues-rock. – Jarrad Bevan / The Mercury
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Sounds like the music I imagine would come from the genetically engineered love child of David Bowie and Joe Walsh. The vocals really remind me of Joe Walsh which is great since he’s the only Eagle whose solo material can make me forget how much I hate the Eagles. – Grant Manship
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The Alive label introduced us to the Black Keys and resurrected rarities from MC5 and the Stooges, so Buffalo Killers seem to suit it perfectly. They succeed at everything that Kings of Leon and other bell-bottomed, nostalgic beardos only try to. Crossing 1970s Laurel Canyon rock with a slow James Gang groove, the band’s Crazy Horse-style jams are sure to appeal to the denim warriors and the legions of the beaded and bearded, while production from the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach is spacious and warm, matching the band’s slow groove perfectly. – Johnson Cummins / Montreal Mirror
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Swampy American blues rock with a mellow psychedelic alt.country/hard rock edge and a breezy feel-good Blue Cheer, Amboy Dukes, Canned Heat vibe. Deeply routed in 60’s US blues and psychedelic country rock, authentically so. – Organ
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The Buffalo Killers sound like the bastard sons of the James Gang and the Black Crowes. But like both bands, the Buffalo Killers come by their sound naturally. It’s organic, dripping with down home funk. It’s groovin’ – oozing with soul, draped in grittiness and filled with tasty, but not overwhelming guitar licks. – Willy Wilson / Real Detroit Weekly
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American rock ‘n’ roll has retreated to the depths of the underground. For the bands that continue the time-honored tradition of smooth talking swagger and stiff lipped cool, they exist only in the eyes of the people who have discovered their clandestine reverberations.
Cincinnati, Ohio’s native Buffalo Killers struts with the moan of a blues-laden trio who mix vintage tone with growling guitars to formulate passionate testimonials of lost love, desperate aggression and reckless endangerment. It is the underbelly of American rock ‘n’ roll, and with the release of their sophomore album, Let It Ride, the Buffalo Killers have been hatched upon the age in a time of desperate need.- Martin Halo / JamBase
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Blessed with some superbly exquisite production by Dan Auerbach at Akron Analog, Let It Ride is pristinely crafted in a decadent retro vibe that seriously wouldn’t look amiss amid a record collection boasting a garage / rock / psych purists smattering of key late 60’s and early 70’s recordings. – Sound On the Sound
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The Let It Ride LP dabbles with the blues and psychedelia as creatively as it re-interprets slide guitar lines. – Christen Thomas / RCRD LBL
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Smoking hot, seductive, slow roasted, and nurtured by the tonal fuzz of Black Keys guitarist Dan Auerbach, the Buffalo Killers are proving to be the black knights of rock’s new doctrine. – Downtown Money Waster
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My advice is to put this on, crank up the volume and let the sound surround you. And make no mistake, the sound will surround you. – Gary Schwind / antiMusic
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Second album in and several large strides made from this Ohio trio. The dense, almost upside down goth beardage may give the game away to their unassuming ruminations – personified in opening preamble lurch to Get Together Now Today – that they straddle carcasses of late sixties colossi. – Stu Gibson / Sleazegrinder
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Buffalo Killers have folded their influences and obvious affinity for 70′s rock into their sound without coming off dated or overly derivative which is often a hard thing to do; instead sounding like a long lost classic which if you’re a regular reader you know is something I can’t resist.- Raven Sings The Blues
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Soundslike review (Belgium) | Gonzai review (France) | Goddeau review (The Netherlands)
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Sometimes you hear a song and it’s fun to listen to and that’s all. – The Fader
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The Buffalo Killers, another band on the rise from the Ohio rust belt music scene, play a wonderful stew of music, clearly inspired by the classic blooze rock of the late ‘60s and ‘70s. At different times, the group’s sound can be both psychedelic and southern fried. One thing’s for sure: It is almost always hard, heavy and crunchy, carrying on a great classic rock tradition at a time when we need it most in this era of half-baked indie pop. – Nonzine
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Cincinnati I have a soft spot for bands that really get me into the classic, groove rock ‘n’ roll with heavy blues influences. Remember, I grew up on a lot of Clapton (Cream, Blind Faith, Derek & the Dominoes, solo work), Traffic and Zep. So I think that’s one of the reasons I got so hooked on The Black Keys (who put on one of the best live shows I’ve ever seen). And Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys produced the new record by Buffalo Killers. It’s called "Let It Ride" and it’s ridicuously good. – Vanessa Franko / Press Enterprise
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Produced by the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, the album has earned the band comparisons to stomping suede-rock legends like Mountain and Grand Funk Railroad. – Lotte Agullo Collins / CMJ
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With gritty guitar work and snappy drum fills, Let it Ride escapes the curse of producing the same album twice by expanding the horizons of the Buffalo Killers’ music. – Heave Media
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The strong melodies and occasional anthemic choruses, however, act as a counter-weight for a heavy set of hard-rock delights. – Jo-Ann Greene / All Music Guide
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Think…Blue Cheer, Jefferson Airplane, and even Frigid Pink!! Roll one and go pick this up!!! – Andy Breighton / The Neus Subjex
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Buffalo Killers did not jump on the bandwagon with Jet, The Darkness, and all the others. They waited it out and created an album that truly captures the Zeppy-Hendrix-Skynard sound of the late ’60s and early ’70s. – URB
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This time around, the trio revels in their talent and sounds more comfortable in their sonic surroundings. The approach is still lively, catchy, primal and analog-natural – it’s one of those records that could have been made 35 years ago, devoid of all the production tricks and treats that make so many albums sound so horrible these days. This is the sound of three guys gathered around a drum kit, not a computer. – City Beat
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