Yours Until The Bitter End out now on Digipak, Color Vinyl & Download

Yours Until The Bitter End
Yours Until The Bitter End
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Yours Until The Bitter End

A superb garage-rock album with twists, turns and a winning eccentricity that’s all too rare in Rock’n’Roll these days. – Whisperin & Hollerin
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A lot of punk bands lose the plot or sap their strength when they decide to add some extra bells and whistles to their sound, but the Bloody Hollies have managed to add a fair amount without losing a thing, and Yours Until the Bitter End is a dial-it-up-to-ten triumph. – Mark Deming / All Music Guide
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Where some bands that I could name start off their recording career with fast and furious insanity, only to rein it in a few albums later, I trust the Bloody Hollies to stay true to their raucous tradition that embraces dense, brutal, gut-punching rock and roll until the bitter end. – Barry St. Vitus / Blurt
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Expands just a tad beyond the basic taters-and-brews backyard slop that keeps many similar bands mired in formulaic rehashes. – John Graham / SF Weekly
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They are truly doing the lord’s work on Yours Until The Bitter End … acknowledging that your conception of God may be different from mine. – Stephen Haag / Popmatters
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There’s lots in the way of digging sharpened fangs into classic forms for sounds that would go great with glasses being slammed back down onto bars. – Mary Leary / MOKB
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Their loud, impetuous vigor may instantly scream revivalism, but bearing in mind that hybridization in pursuit of originality mostly backfires, it’s a pleasure to still see bands sticking to an agenda that is classic in design and off bounds from any pop sensibilities. – LA Deli Magazine
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Takes an if-it-ain’t-broke-don’t-fix-it approach, and the quartet’s ragged charm remains squarely intact, even when a seemingly errant violin or xylophone creeps into the mix. – MOKB
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This Buffalo-born quartet continues to combine the menace of metal, the feral energy of punk rock, the panache of surf guitar, the non-stop drive of southern boogie and the rough-edges of the garage. – Hyperbolium
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Yours Until the Bitter End found the Bloody Hollies supplementing their sound with much more elaborate arrangements and songwriting — not to mention occasional touches of organ, violin, and xylophone. There’s even a little interlude at the end of the song “Dead Letter” that I swear must be a musical reference to the legendary psychedelic folk-rock band Love.
This could be a tricky transition, but I think the Bloody Hollies will have an easier time than some of their peers. For one thing, they never did seem particularly purist about their garage rock. There has always been as much Stooges in their sound as there has been Nuggets. For another, they’ve still got Doyle’s ragged scream. With that voice, he could sing lullabies and still sound like garage punk. – San Diego Reader
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Energetic and alive throughout this is a really strong collection. – Terrascope Rumbles
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more PRESS

The fuzz is turned up, tempos are dashing to the finish line and Doyle’s sense of rock ‘n’ roll urgency and abandon prove the comparisons to be only skin deep. If you are sick of garage bands simply sleepwalking through the ’60s songbooks, then the Bloody Hollies could be your new favourite band. – Montreal Mirror
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The Bloody Hollies are a bass-less, blues-drenched riff monster fronted by a powerfully hoarse singer-guitarist, and they will turn your ears and limbs to jelly if you let them, which you should. Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love is their third album, it’s full of energy and drama, and it’s the best excuse to test the limits of your stereo that I’ve heard all year. – Tom Useted / Pop Matters (rating : 7 out of 10)
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Blues and punk, at their roots, have much in common. The Bloody Hollies understand that and blend them in the best ways. – Ryan A. Bunch / Toledo City Paper
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With a heavy shot of blues thrown into their garage rock mix, the Bloody Hollies have delivered their most solid disc to date. Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love features the San Diego groups’ tunefully electric songwriting in peak form on tracks such as "Rain" and "Satanic Satellite." – Rob Nay / Exclaim
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Wes Doyle sounds less like Jack White and more like an animal screaming lovely death screams under a hailstorm of third-degree blues-guitar burns. And that’s a good thing. – Troy Johnson / San Diego City Beat
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The trio’s hybrid of punk rock and hard blues really, really works. High-energy rock with good songs is pretty rare these days. With stratospheric vocals, take-no-prisoners guitar work and a rhythm section that won’t quit, this crunchingly-produced CD is one of the best hard rock albums I’ve heard in a while. – Jon Sobel / Blogcritics
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Doyle and the Bloody Hollies are certainly positive ambassadors for the Buffalo music scene, musically speaking. Consider that in 2004 the group made it to Austin’s revered SXSW Festival, earning positive notices from several of the various newspapers in attendance. Shortly thereafter, the group was spotted and hailed by legendary BBC DJ John Peel, who played the band’s music and then invited Doyle and Co. across the pond for a visit and high-profile guest slot on his "The Peel Sessions." After relocating to San Diego in 2005, and reforming the band with new musicians, Doyle and the Hollies released If Footmen Tire You . . . , which handily nailed a San Diego Music Award for rock album of the year. – Jeff Miers / Buffalo News
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Rock isn’t a fucking history lesson. The Bloody Hollies do it because they love the blues and they love the rock. – Beer Powered Bicycle
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Don’t be fooled it is still Punk, Blues, Rock and Roll. – Another Sunny Day In Pop
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Who to Trust… is a whiskey-and-cigarettes album, its energy amplified by the simplicity of the material, allowing the performance and commitment to shine through. – John Clarkson / Pennyblackmusic
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Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love is gassed-up, nononsense, up the bracket, balls out, deal or no deal, fight to the finish, ready to rumble rock and roll. Ain’t no cry babies here, boy. – Adam Simpkins / The Nerve magazine
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Raw, three-chord rock ‘n’ roll combining metal, glam and punk, San Diego’s The Bloody Hollies’ sound is equal parts T-Rex and Guns N’ Roses on their new album. – Jim Trageser.com
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A garage-blues-punk clusterfuck that’s energetic and full of crunching riffs and pounding drums. – HearYa
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Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love is a beguiling blend of attitude and musicianship. – Jim Trageser / NC Times
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Whether you call it garage punk, blues or just flat-out rock ‘n’ roll, the Bloody Hollies make a racket as piercing as the engine of a Harley. – Fred Shuster / LA Daily News
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As the group’s lead guitarist, Doyle fuses blues and metal into an explosive output, which he occasionally fuels with smoking harmonica. – Knoxnews
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They’re a driven, lyrically-inspired gang of fellow blues/punk/rock lovers who’ve somehow managed to combine their most deeply ingrained influences (Howlin’ Wolf, Junior Kimbrough, long-forgotten Deep Southern troubadours with names like Limpin’ Larry Jones and One-Eye Jackson) with the obvious (pre-major label Stooges, The Count Five, varying punk influences ranging from The Minutemen to Dead Boys to 999) and their own genuine love for amps that go past "11" to create a sound that’s both in-the-moment and comfortingly familiar at the same time. – Pulse of The Twin Cities
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It doesn’t matter how you slice it, dice it or mince it up it’s still some of the best rock n’ roll to ever pierce a set of eardrums. – Richard Oliver / Ear Candy
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In addition to walls of distorted guitar, there are pinches of organ thrown in that make for a decidedly ’60s vibe. Doyle’s high-pitched vocal assault is rife with grunts and groans, but can also come off disarming during less turbulent moments. – Interview with Wesley in PE.com
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The Bloody Hollies’ "C’est La Vie, Ma Cherie" from their new album Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love was just played on Indie 103.1 on Jonesy’s Jukebox, hosted by original Sex Pistol himself, Steve Jones. Steve said the band is "very grim" and went on to say that they are "very much a ‘kill-yourself’ sort of a band." I listen to Jonesy a lot and that is high praise from the man. – Dialed In
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They take on board the 60′s garage psych and use that base to propel themselves aggressively in to the middle of next week. Raw and riffed up to the max, wired as hell, rusty finger cutting edges on those wires, this is good. – Organ (UK)
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The Bloody Hollies are one of the most rocking bands I’ve heard in some time. – Either/or
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The metamorphosis of the Bloody Hollies from simply a really good band to a group of possible historical importance continues. Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love is far less urgent than last year’s epic scorcher If Footmen Tire You but ultimately richer in a lasting sense. – Justin Habersaat / Altercation Magazine
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Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love takes what was great about the Bloody Hollies’ first two albums, refines the formula, adds some solid new accents, and ends up with a killer album that has brains, muscle, and sweat in equal measure. – Mark Deming / All Music Guide
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The Bloody Hollies fulfil the promise that bands like Von Bondies ultimately failed to deliver – a disc of genuine invention and excitement. – Adult Contemporary
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The Bloddy Hollies are at their best on this disc, kudos guys for a job well fucking done! – Sameerah / Ectomag
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Who To to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love is an album of balls-out, baddass rock and rock roll with a huge, blown-out. killer live room drum sound, dirty guitars and blusey vocals that recall The Strokes swagger. – Gordon B. Isnor / Left Hip magazine
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Hell, I have never been a man of risk but when it comes to quality, growth and double barrel rock and roll then the Bloody Hollies have the spades. – Christopher Duda / Sugarbuzz Magazine
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If Rock ‘n’ Roll were doused in gasoline and set aflame with a Zippo lighter, The Bloody Hollies would erupt forth in a fiery rush of amplified madness. – Moser / Under The Volcano
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The Bloody Hollies newest disc, Who to Trust, Who to Kill, Who to Love is blistering. I could stop there and that would sum it up for this review but I couldn’t stop without telling you how raw yet refined these guys come across. Guitars that makes your guts twist, vocals that will make your brain tighten, drums and bass that push and pull your toes as the music hits your existence. – Jeff Jackson / Music Filter
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