Listen to Everyday Things from Walking Out On Love/The Lost Sessions


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The BREAKAWAYS
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Last year, Paul Collins was rummaging through his garage when he discovered a cardboard box containing a number of demos he recorded in the late 1970s with Peter Case. Somewhere behind the holiday decorations and haphazardly stacked lawn furniture, Collins had unwittingly stored the entire the Breakaways catalog, the otherwise unrecorded band that filled the gap between Collins’ and Case’s work together with the Nerves and their respective solo(-ish) careers with the Paul Collins Beat and the Plimsouls. Those 13 literally hidden tracks include stripped-down versions of Nerves standards (“One Way Ticket”, “Working Too Hard”) and early takes of later favorites like “Everyday Things”, which Case took with him to the Plimsouls. Collins’ work is more heavily represented, including a Turtles-tinged blueprint for “I Don’t Fit In” and a surprisingly familiar-sounding first take of “Let Me Into Your Life”. While the quality occasionally reflects their budgetary limitations, the songs are raw but never sloppy. Walking Out on Love: The Lost Sessions is power pop in its purest form, with guitars that seemingly race the drums before crashing headlong into the choruses, and for fans of Case and Collins, this collection is one of the most essential things to come out of a garage since William Hewlett hired Dave Packard. – Jelisa Castrodale / PopMatters
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The thirteen songs include a few that had been recorded by the Nerves such as “One Way Ticket” and “Working Too Hard,” as well as originals that would become staples for the Plimsouls (“Everyday Things”) and Beat (“I Don’t Fit In,” “Let Me Into Your Life,” “USA” and “Walking Out on Love”). Even more interesting to fans are the originals that didn’t make it past these rough demos. “Radio Station” features the deep reverb guitar and impassioned vocal Case would perfect with the Plimsouls, “Will You Come Through?” has the ringing guitar of a P.F. Sloan folk rocker, and “House on the Hill” shows off Case’s rock ‘n’ soul sound.
“Little Suzy” and the rhythm-guitar propelled “Do You Want to Love Me?” As Collins notes in the liners, “this is the sound of pop on the streets of Los Angeles circa 1978, no money, no deals, just the burning desire to make something happen in a town without pity.” Case and Collins approached these sessions with the unbridled passion and total dedication of musicians without masters – no label, no audience, no radio stations, no managers or agents, just the muse of pop music. The recordings may be fuzzy in spots, but the invention is clear as a chiming bell. – Hyperbolium
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Between the breakup of L.A. power pop legends The Nerves and the formation of their equally legendary bands The Beat (not to be confused with the English Beat) and the Plimsouls, Paul Collins and Peter Case had a band called the Breakaways. Although the group never really quite got off the ground, they did manage to record a few demos of some tunes from the Nerves’ set list and, in the case of the title track, some that would also feature in the Beat’s future set list. These tapes were apparently mislaid for many a moon, but have been rediscovered and released. The sound quality is great considering these are demos and they’re some thirty-odd years old, and the songs, well, we are talking about the dudes responsible for “Rock ’n’ Roll Girl” and “A Million Miles Away,” so of course the tunes are top notch. – Jimmy Alvarado / Razorcake
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If the Nerves were the great lost band of the L.A. power pop scene, then the Breakaways should at least rank in the Top Ten. After Jack Lee left the Nerves, his bandmates Peter Case and Paul Collins wasted no time in starting a new group, the Breakaways, and while that band would last less than a year and dissolve without releasing a record, they were the crucial stepping stone that led to Case forming the sublime Plimsouls and Collins cutting a pair of top-notch albums with the Beat. – All Music Guide
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The Breakaways never had an official release, but this 13-cut collection compiles excellent studio recordings, demos and acoustic rehearsals from the group, and any powerpop fanatic, and obviously fans of the Nerves, Plimsouls or Beat albums, will be thrilled with the discovery. There are several songs that overlap with some of the other projects, including a harmony-laden acoustic version of the Nerves’ "One Way Ticket," and a great full-band studio take of "Working Too Hard," which was a Nerves staple as well as appearing on the first Beat album.
The group sputtered out before it got off the ground, morphing into the Beat as Case left to pursue his own "solo" career with the Plimsouls — the Breakaways were a rare band blessed with too many talented singer/songwriters(!) — but this recently unearthed trove is a wonderful glimpse at what might have been. These guys both continued their quests for the perfect pop confection with different bands, but not before Walking Out on Love. – Josh Madell / Other Music
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Continuing on the same punked-up garage pop path of the Nerves, Case and Collins bang out a baker’s dozen power pop gems (“Everyday Things,” “Little Suzy,” “USA,” “Radio Station”) with sharp melody, tight skill and unabashed enthusiasm. Due to budgetary concerns and multiple locations, the fidelity is all over the place – it’s only by the grace of the songs and performances that tracks like “I Don’t Fit In” and “Will You Come Through?” are salvageable at all. But there’s not a duff tune in the bunch – Collins obviously agreed, as many of his tunes (including the popular “Walking Out On Love” and “Working Too Hard”) ended up in the Beat’s repertoire. Case’s songs, strangely, were never re-recorded, not even with the Plimsouls, whose catalog seems to be the natural repository for a song like “House On the Hill.” While that means Case diehards definitely need this, arguably any power pop fan, especially of the late 70s/early 80s variety, would love to add this to his or her library. – Michael Toland / The Big Takeover
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In these 13 tunes you have buzzing pop energy of cuts like “Little Suzy”, “One Way Ticket”, “USA” , and, of course, “Walking Out on Love” (which Portland’s sadly deceased Exploding Hearts covered). The sound quality isn’t the best on some of the cuts but heck, for us fans of the genre that’s a minor quibble as the energy and hooks on these tunes more than make up for it. Pick this unearthed gem up and thank the good folks at Bomp/Alive for its existence. – Dagger
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Lo-fi basement tapes these, Walking Out On Love (The Lost Sessions) documents the brief life of The Breakaways, a project Paul Collins and future Plimsoul Peter Case formed after late-’70s L.A. power-pop heroes The Nerves broke up.
Get past the scratchy, demo-quality recordings, and you’ll find rough-cut diamonds of tough, hook-filled garage-rock like “Do You Want To Love Me?” and “I Don’t Fit In” that have a spark of that old ’60s British Invasion magic. – Peter Lindblad / Goldmine
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It may have taken 30 years, but here this group of songs exist… And they need/needed to be heard. The quality goes up and down from mid-fi to lo-fi but all of it has a certain ring to it for ear like mine that enjoy a bit of abbrasive-ness in their rock and roll from time to time. This is for fans of THE REAL KIDS or other power-pop/punk back when it all was still considered new-wave. There’s some gems on this one like “Working Too Hard” or “Little Suzy” or the highly addictive fist-pumping (but not in the MTV Lame-ass JERSEY SHORE style of fist-pumping) “Radio Station” that I bet TEENGENERATE really would like. – Bad Day At The Plastic Mines
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The fact that Peter Case never knew that these recordings existed should drop a huge powerpop fat man bomb beneath your ass, and alert you lazy mp3 downloading click happy trigger fingers to the importance of this discovery. Gee, and you thought the discovery of King Tuts tomb by Howard Carter was the most important unearthing of the last 100 + years! – Sugarbuzz Magazine
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